Powering America: A Time for Alternatives

Question:

Different issues. Last year I don’t recall any shortages on the scale of this year. . . . . As to the question of additional refining capacity…lot’s of mergers, some plants have been modernized and are actually producing more product than ever. However why build a new refinery until the government gives you an incentive. Shortages raise prices. Good for business.

 I can get 3+% in  Gov’t bond, a refinery gets about 2-2.5% return on investment. Where would an intelligent person put their money? Why hasn’t there been more refining capacity added in the last few years? There is currently no shortage of oil, only a shortage of refining capacity.

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Response:

Oil.  I can get 3+% in  Gov’t bond, a refinery gets about 2-2.5% return on investment. Where would an intelligent person put their money?

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Response:

You don’t refuel all the cars at the same time. Shoddy regulatory practice to shut all nukes at the same time, especially considering the present need. Staggering is the word I think of — staggeringly stupid to do so, but also staggering the refueling might have been a good thing.

They did and do.  A big reactor in AZ (Palo Verde) was refueled in April or so, and now in May, Diablo Canyon Unit 2 (1102 MW) is down for refueling. Unfortunately San Onofre Unit 3 (1108.7 MW) had a fire in February and is still off line. See the "Non-Operational Generating Units" link on the CalISO page at <http://www.caiso.com/SystemStatus.html. — In-Real-Life: Chris Torek, Wind River Systems

Response:

You don’t refuel all the cars at the same time. Shoddy regulatory practice to shut all nukes at the same time, especially considering the present need. Staggering is the word I think of — staggeringly stupid to do so, but also staggering the refueling might have been a good thing. Just like cars NUKEs need refueling. The best time is either the spring or fall. Should we just run them until August and then have them shutdown automactically when their fuel is gone?????

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Response:

You don’t refuel all the cars at the same time. Shoddy regulatory practice to shut all nukes at the same time, especially considering the present need.

Most all  race cars pit for fuel near the same lap count.

Response:

OK, then how about the electric shortage? Why hasn’t there been more refining capacity added in the last few years? The electric shortage is mainly caused by plants being shut down so that very high prices can be charged for the remaining power.

This reminds me of the game union workers play… One union slug calls in sick at the last moment causing the company to jump through their ass to get a replacement worker for that shift and paying a premium for it.. and maybe even screwup with the turn list and cause a grievence on top of the situation. Most of the plants run on – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – NG, not oil or refined oil. The refiners are playing the same game. If less oil is refined, they get more for what they do refine.

Response:

Yes certainly a time for alternatives! Why is it that with 4% of world population, the USA produces 25% of greenhouse gas emissions?

Maybe we (US)  are playing too much policeman for the world and causing too much greenhouse emissions. .  Instead of defending other nations and playing peacemaker, the US should divert that money to making the US more energy efficient.  Let one nation kick the shit out of another without US intervention.  Cool.

Response:

Most is not all. Races cars are not road cars. You don’t refuel all the cars at the same time. Shoddy regulatory practice to shut all nukes at the same time, especially considering the present need. Most all  race cars pit for fuel near the same lap count.

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Response:

Yes certainly a time for alternatives! Why is it that with 4% of world population, the USA produces 25% of greenhouse gas emissions? Primarily, the cause is profligate, inefficient use of the energy already available, and under utilisation of available cost effective renewable resources. Do you know that compact flourescent light bulbs use only 25% of the electricity of conventional incandescent bulbs, last considerably longer, and in any light left on for several hours a day will save money in under a year! Make sure your hot water tank and piping are well insulated, that will pay for itself in weeks! Switch off "phantum loads" these are TV’s, video recorders etc. left on standby when not in use. Each one draws about 10 watts. This can easily add up to 100 watts doing nothing useful in an average house. In Greece, with a simelar climate to southern california, nearly everyone uses solar panels to heat their water. Particularly for people in the southern states, consider installing a solar panel. If everyone did this, there would definately be no shortage of electricity. Install reflective window blinds, particularly on windows subject to direct sunlight, this will significantly reduce load on air conditioning units, saving considerable amounts of electricity, as well as making your air conditioner last longer. Improvements to building insulation will have the same effect. When buying new apliances, ensure that you are buying the best built, most energy efficient products you can afford. They will save you money in the long run, as well as being better for the environment. Finally, encourage the installation of significantly more wind turbines (avoiding areas of outstanding beauty, or ecological fragility). In Europe, many wind farms are being planned for offshore locations.         United Kingdom – Licences issued for 1.5GW.         Germany             – Private consortia are seeking permission                                        for  4GW.         Republic of Ireland – Dublin Bay project planned to produce enough electricity to power all Dublin’s 200,000 homes.         Holland, Denmark, Sweden – All have existing offshore wind farms, and plans for substantial expansion.     On good sites, wind can compete on a level playing field with the cost of any other form of generation. What is more, in Denmark, the wind industry is both a major employer, and a major exporter. The same could be true anywhere else that enthusiastically embraced wind generated electricity.     If all these suggestions were adopted, along with other energy efficiency strategies, then the USA could close down a large proportion of its older more polluting generators, and meet international expectations regarding mitigation of climate change. This could be done while growing the economy, and without bringing about a recession. I believe in fact that living standards would in fact rise significantly as the country prospered due to greater productivity per Kw hour.

Response:

OK, then how about the electric shortage?

Of the proposed power plants that have been delayed or blocked, 12 were opposed by the utility companies. One was opposed by Cisco. Environmental groups have advocated for some of the plants that were blocked by industry, either because they would like old and polluting plants replaced with efficient, clean plant, or (in the case of Calpine) because the proposed location minimizes environmental damage by locating the plant near an existing transmission corridor. … but in any case, as anyone knows who has assessed their energy usage, most of the energy we "use" is actually wasted. It doesn’t make sense to build dozens of new plants without first aggressively conserving energy. Otherwise, 50-80% of the energy from new plants will merely be thrown away, right off the top.

Response:

Different issues. Last year I don’t recall any shortages on the scale of this year. In fact in California this winter, there was a lot of capacity off-line for repair/maintenance, and at this very moment all of the Nukes are off-line for re-fueling (a wonderful coincindence that the feds allowed that to happen.)

Just like cars NUKEs need refueling. The best time is either the spring or fall. Should we just run them until August and then have them shutdown automactically when their fuel is gone????? So how in the space of 1 year did everything get so crazy? Certainly a large part is the ability of the generators to "legally" game the system. And another would be the lack of hydro due to drought conditions.

The system has been degrading for several years. The system used to have a 15-20% reserve overhead.  That is:  demand is 15-20% below supply. But as no plants were built, demand grew. Even though CA residents use the least energy per capita than anywhere else in the nation, the sheer number of people and industry drove up demand. BTW: Residental electric usage is only 20% of demand. Industry takes at least 50%.  As demand keep rising, the reserve kept shrinking. Warnings were given time and again over the past several years. But most people don’t like bad news. It took a 2×4 between the eyes (blackouts) to jolt people. Yes there may be gaming, but I believe it to be a small percentage of the total. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Lack of grid interties also contributes, but the real answer is…no shortage of electricity, just a shortage of cheap dependable electricity. And that’s the way it’s going to be from now on. As to the question of additional refining capacity…lot’s of mergers, some plants have been modernized and are actually producing more product than ever. However why build a new refinery until the government gives you an incentive. Shortages raise prices. Good for business. OK, then how about the electric shortage? Why hasn’t there been more refining capacity added in the last few years? There is currently no shortage of oil, only a shortage of refining capacity.

Response:

OK, then how about the electric shortage? Why hasn’t there been more refining capacity added in the last few years?

The electric shortage is mainly caused by plants being shut down so that very high prices can be charged for the remaining power. Most of the plants run on NG, not oil or refined oil. The refiners are playing the same game. If less oil is refined, they get more for what they do refine.

Response:

Different issues. Last year I don’t recall any shortages on the scale of this year. In fact in California this winter, there was a lot of capacity off-line for repair/maintenance, and at this very moment all of the Nukes are off-line for re-fueling (a wonderful coincindence that the feds allowed that to happen.) So how in the space of 1 year did everything get so crazy? Certainly a large part is the ability of the generators to "legally" game the system. And another would be the lack of hydro due to drought conditions. Lack of grid interties also contributes, but the real answer is…no shortage of electricity, just a shortage of cheap dependable electricity. And that’s the way it’s going to be from now on. As to the question of additional refining capacity…lot’s of mergers, some plants have been modernized and are actually producing more product than ever. However why build a new refinery until the government gives you an incentive. Shortages raise prices. Good for business. OK, then how about the electric shortage? Why hasn’t there been more refining capacity added in the last few years? There is currently no shortage of oil, only a shortage of refining capacity.

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Response:

There is currently no shortage of oil, only a shortage of refining capacity. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Powering America: A Time for Alternatives With the threat of continued power shortages in California, and talk of gasoline prices approaching upwards of three dollars per gallon this summer, America can no longer afford to ignore its need to explore various energy-producing alternatives, including building new nuclear power plants and drilling for oil in Alaska’s wilderness. Any potential for increasing domestic energy production is worth exploring. While such action is bitterly opposed by environmental extremists, our country’s need to reduce our dependence on foreign sources of oil is plainly obvious. It is imperative that we have intelligent and bold leadership on the issue of domestic oil exploration– something that was most definitely lacking during the eight years of the previous administration.

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Response:

OK, then how about the electric shortage? Why hasn’t there been more refining capacity added in the last few years?

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – There is currently no shortage of oil, only a shortage of refining capacity. Powering America: A Time for Alternatives With the threat of continued power shortages in California, and talk of gasoline prices approaching upwards of three dollars per gallon this summer, America can no longer afford to ignore its need to explore various energy-producing alternatives, including building new nuclear power plants and drilling for oil in Alaska’s wilderness. Any potential for increasing domestic energy production is worth exploring. While such action is bitterly opposed by environmental extremists, our country’s need to reduce our dependence on foreign sources of oil is plainly obvious. It is imperative that we have intelligent and bold leadership on the issue of domestic oil exploration– something that was most definitely lacking during the eight years of the previous administration. — Remove "REMOVE" from address (when present) for reply by e-mail

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