Heater for Catalina 25

Question:

: The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until : early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the : early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin : heater. : I sail a 25′ Catalina and would be interested in hearing what people : have done about installing some type of heater in the cabin.         For some years I have carried a Primus propane heater on my Hunter 25.  The heater looks like a small floodlight.  It sits atop a disposable propane bottle.  I use it for about fifteen minutes in the evening when getting ready for bed and about fifteen minutes in the morning while getting dressed.  I never leave it running unattended.  It really helps to take the chill off.  With such low duty cycles the propane bottles last quite a long time.  It has the advantage of being inexpensive and simple. —   Fabbian G. Dufoe, III   St. Petersburg, Florida  33705 |   813-823-2350                   | 27 deg 44.5 min N, 82 deg 38.3 min W

Response:

        Dave,         The Origo alcohol heater sounds like the way to go. It’s fairly cheap and can heat up a cabin within 45 minutes. The other big advantage is there is no need for a vent pipe (just open the hatch a little).         We have used ours for about two years. When it is freezing outside the cabin stays around 70.         Good Luck                 Brad Bachelor                 "Cool Change"

Response:

: The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until : early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the : early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin : heater.         David-                 What’s your stove like?  There is a product($20) that                 is a metal box, with a hemispheracal(SP?) shaped refl-                 ector inside.  There also is a small metal mesh "teepee"                 shaped cone , suspended in the middle of the box.  The                 stove burner heats the mesh cone, it glows red!  the                 reflector radiates the heat out into the boat cabin,                 works fine, also its perched on stove so it is stable,                 even if it fell off, chances of burning something are                 slim.  as always, never leave such a stove burning                 unattended or whilst snoozing.                 kens

Response:

The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin heater. —   Er hat uns allen wohlegetan…  –  J. S. Bach

Hi David, I read a post about a heater on the Catalina mail list. To       the subject is unimportant, but the body of the message must read:                       subscribe catalina_list      put nothing else in the body of the message. Lots of great info there!

Response:

: The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until : early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the : early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin : heater. : Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated. An acquaintance with a Catalina 25 uses an inverted clay flower pot on his Origo non-pressurized alchohol stove.  Make sure you have good ventilation. Another friend, who had an old non-heated camper van years ago, used to heat a large bowl of water and leave that in the van on cold nights.  Based on the theory, and for all I know it may have worked, that the temperature in the van could not drop below zero until the water was frozen. B.S!

Response:

I have a Cole Charcoal Furnace on my boat and it works quite well.  It is safe and easy to use.  Simply put 6 or 7 charcoal briquets in the burner section with a little wadded up newspaper and light it.  It warms up the cabin quite nicely and lasts for about two hours.  it is easy to add charcoal to to keep it going and also dries the boat out in cold humid weather.  The boat used to be kept on Lake Superior and the heater sometimes had to beused in the middle of the summer.  I believe I have seen them in the Defender Industries catalog.  They aren’t cheap but take up minimal space as they mount in a bulkhead and the chimney pipe only sticks out of the cabin roof about 10".  Hope this is helpful information.                                   N                                 |         Dave Andersen           /         s/v Blu-Fin         W-  O  -E         Albin Vega 27         /                                   |                                 S – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin heater. I sail a 25′ Catalina and would be interested in hearing what people have done about installing some type of heater in the cabin. Our limitations:    *       Limited cabin space (of course… it’s a 25 footer)    *       We don’t have onboard propane installed    *       The boat’s equipped with an outboard so using the            engine for heat isn’t an option.    *       The storage capacity of the electrical system is around            100ah.  The battery is kept topped off when we’re not            on the boat by a solar panel which will yield a full charge            in about four days (not a problem as the battery only            gets minimal usage during day sails, and overnighters            occur less than once a week).    *       The boat is kept in a slip without electricity. I would consider a propaine installation if there is a space concious solution.  What other options are there??? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated. —   Er hat uns allen wohlegetan…  –  J. S. Bach

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin heater. I sail a 25′ Catalina and would be interested in hearing what people have done about installing some type of heater in the cabin. Our limitations:    *       Limited cabin space (of course… it’s a 25 footer)    *       We don’t have onboard propane installed    *       The boat’s equipped with an outboard so using the            engine for heat isn’t an option.    *       The storage capacity of the electrical system is around            100ah.  The battery is kept topped off when we’re not            on the boat by a solar panel which will yield a full charge            in about four days (not a problem as the battery only            gets minimal usage during day sails, and overnighters            occur less than once a week).    *       The boat is kept in a slip without electricity. I would consider a propaine installation if there is a space concious solution.  What other options are there??? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated. —  Er hat uns allen wohlegetan…  –  J. S. Bach

Since I own a Freedom 21 and sail in Seattle, I can relate to your problems. I have found the ideal stove/cabin heater.  It is single burner, burns kerosine, uses outside air, exhausts to the outside, and converts to a cabin heater by lowering the cover and turning on a built-in fan.  And at the price of $850 (yes — Eight Hundred Fifty!) I will buy one as soon as I win the lottery.  In the meanwhile I finally gave in and bought an Origo 5000, which was the recommendation I got the most when I asked the question a few years back.  It has been re-designed for this year, and is now called the Origo 5100, which was, in my humble opinion, a mistake. Try to get the original — there are still stores with old stock of the 5000. This heater burns alcohol, supposedly puts out 5000 BTU’s, and with the cover turned upside down to convert it to a single burner stve, will boil 2 cups of water in 16 minutes in an ambient temperature of 40 degrees F. — I timed it last night out in my almost frozen garage. I am a bit luckier in that I have electricity at my slip and keep one of those air dryer thingies going all the time — it uses about 60 watts and keeps the interior of my boat mildew free all year long. Good luck, and if you have $850 to spend, let me know and I will post the info on the cadillac of stoves described in my first paragraph! —     Boeing Computer Services, M/S 2L-40, PO Box 24346, Seattle WA 98124     Character is like a fence: it can’t be strengthened with whitewash.                            –Don’t Tread On Me–

Response:

I sail a 25′ Catalina and would be interested in hearing what people have done about installing some type of heater in the cabin.

Origo makes a non-pressurized alcohol heater that sells for $99 at West Marine.  A fellow liveaboard on my dock has one, and we all think it’s a great heater.  We’ve torture tested it pretty hard, including flipping it over while it’s lit.   The advantage of alcohol is that it’s not very hot–it doesn’t set things on fire very easily, and you won’t burn yourself very badly. The non-pressurized part means that the alcohol is stored in what is essentially a fancy sponge.  So when you flip it over, most of the alcohol stays in the sponge.  Sure, a little drips out, but alcohol burns at such a low temperature, you can put it out with your foot. The Origo unit is about the size of a 3-gallon pot, and is made of aluminum.  It folds in half for better storage, and is very light. I highly recommend it. –Matthew

Response:

The boating season in Northern Utah can extend from early April until early November.  However, the weather does become fairly cold in the early spring and late fall and it would be nice to have a cabin heater. I sail a 25′ Catalina and would be interested in hearing what people have done about installing some type of heater in the cabin. Our limitations:         *       Limited cabin space (of course… it’s a 25 footer)         *       We don’t have onboard propane installed         *       The boat’s equipped with an outboard so using the                 engine for heat isn’t an option.         *       The storage capacity of the electrical system is around                 100ah.  The battery is kept topped off when we’re not                 on the boat by a solar panel which will yield a full charge                 in about four days (not a problem as the battery only                 gets minimal usage during day sails, and overnighters                 occur less than once a week).         *       The boat is kept in a slip without electricity. I would consider a propaine installation if there is a space concious solution.  What other options are there??? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated. —   Er hat uns allen wohlegetan…  –  J. S. Bach

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