Installing Solar Panels In New Construction

Question:

whats OTOH?

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Response:

Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Response:

Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)?

If the solar collector is designed for this type of installation, it can be neater looking and save on roofing material costs. 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel?

No. Some types of solar collectors – particularly tubular evacuated glass tube collectors – would leak badly when it rained, and cannot substitute for roofing. 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?)

Depends on installation. A proper installation, whether built into the roof (like a skylight) or mounted on top will not leak. I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

I mounted a mast for a tv antenna on my roof, drilling a hole through the shingles and anchoring the base with a lagbolt – and sealing it with silicone caulk. 10 years later, and still no leaks. Plumbing vent pipes and metal chimneys are punched through roofing, but with proper use of metal and rubber flashing they can be leak free. CM

Response:

whats OTOH?

http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/ http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/html/entry/OTOH.html OTOH // [Usenet; very common] On The Other Hand. Hi, all-

Hi We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)?

It can be an OK idea. Your mileage may vary. You will save the costs of the shingles and solar panel mounts. You will likely have labor costs for the installation of both shingles and PV panels anyhow so combining the two into a single step may save some money. 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel?

It works better if you use solar panels that are designed for this task. Look for "building integrated" solar panels such as the Uni-Solar stuff. Some random links found using google. http://www.uni-solar.com/bipv_resid.html http://atlantisenergy.com/atlhome/product.htm http://www.powerlight.com/products/product_details.cfm?product_id=23 http://www.solarwall.com/roof/roof.html http://www.bfrl.nist.gov/863/bipv/documents/ieeeFNL.pdf http://www.energotech.gr/solar3.htm http://www.ntb.ch/TT/Labors/EMS/solar_window.html 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?)

It all depends on the installation, panels and type of roof. I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking.

It depends on the technology you are using. For instance, the standing seam panels from Uni-Solar are 9 to 18 feet long. You can also get the field applied laminate and stick it to any size roofing panels that are larger than these dimensions. All of their connectors are on one end. This end is typically mounted at the roof peak. This is not going to require a lot of holes in the roof and seems unlikely to leak. This is also likely to be somewhat more durable and longer lasting than the typical asphalt shingle. Anthony

Response:

http://info.astrian.net/jargon/terms/o/OTOH.html

Response:

Hi Edward; whats OTOH?

An an acronym: OTOH = On The Other Hand http://www.acronymfinder.com/ Duane —      Home of the $35 LED solar tracker.     http://www.redrok.com/electron.htm#led3    CUL8ER                          Receiver   Powered by                            [*]  Thermonuclear     SolarEnergyfrom the Sun /////| Energy(the Sun)                 / / // / /|                               / / /  /  /  / |    WA0VBE               /   / /   /   /  / /|   Ziggy               /    /    / /   /    /  |                   /   /    /     / /   /  / | "Red Rock Energy" ===  === /   /     ===   /    === Duane C. Johnson, Designer===   ===       ===  /  | 1825 Florence St  Mirrors,Heliostats,Controls & Mounts| White Bear Lake, Minnesota                     /   | USA         55110-3364                            | (651)635-5O65    work                        /    | (651)426-4766   home  use Courier New Font        | (413)556-659O  Fax                copyright   /     | (651)583-2O62 Red Rock Energy Site (C)980907  ===    | http://www.redrok.com/index.htm    (My New Web site) | These are my opinions, and not that of Unisys Corp.  ===

Response:

The shape of mounting brackets makes flashing an exercise in futility. What you should do is have square pitch boxes fabricated at a metal shop. Mount those to the roof. Cut through the bottom of the pitch box, mount the brackets to your structural members, and fill the pitch boxes with hot tar. Then counter flash the pitch box.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Response:

The best I have seen are the field applied standing seam PV panels from Unisolar. Finding a roofing sub contractor to your prime building contractor that can apply these may be a challenge though. http://www.uni-solar.com/bipv_resid_field_appl.html

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Response:

Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)?

Depends on what you are trying to accomplish.  If you want it to look better, a "built-in" look might be preferable to something just sitting on the roof.  OTOH-it might make it more diffiuclt to do whatever maintanence might be required, or to repair a roof leak should it occur down the road. 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?)

I doubt there is sufficient evidence to make a determination on something like this.  Until hundreds of thousands of such installations exist for dozens of years, there is no way to really tell.  The installation issue is a major kicker in the pants as well. There are very few people with any substantial experience in this type of installation, so getting someone that has put in a few hundred of them is going to be difficult. I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Shingles are pretty cheap compared to the solar panels.  The few dollars saved in materials is insignificant, compared to the extra labor, and probably the extra materials required to put the panels in. I think it boils down to this – if you want to build them in, get someone who has done it many times before.  Get many references from the installer and call the references and see what they have to say. Ask the references if they know of anyone else who has done this and call them.  In the end, you will probably have to make a judgement call, and live with the results.

Response:

Edward C. wrote whats OTOH?

…..On The Other Hand….. HTH (Hope This Helps) Caroline xxx

Response:

I remember when Reagan took office he had all the panels removed from the roof of the Whitehouse that Carter installed. What if one of the Reagan’s or Bush’s are interested in buying your home, and they can’t remove the panels? :) Retrofit gives you more options. — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

I remember when Reagan took office he had all the panels removed from the roof of the Whitehouse that Carter installed. What if one of the Reagan’s or Bush’s are interested in buying your home, and they can’t remove the panels? :) Retrofit gives you more options.

… What if someone buys your house and they don’t like the kitchen sink or counter? What if they don’t like the lime green toilet or want to change the wood shingles for concrete ones? Anything in a house can be changed, removed, rebuilt or remodeled. All it takes it money and/or time. Potentially, a well installed and attractive looking solar system could be an asset and may increase the selling price of the house. A poorly installed and ugly one may not, even if it does the job perfectly well. Personally, I’ve never been fond of the whole "your house is an investment" idea that the real estate folks like to push. Yes, you may sell your house at some point but is it worth it to live in a house that is designed to fit the lowest common denominator or which someone else tells you other people want in a home? In my experience, the homes that obtain the highest selling prices are ones which a person used their own personal style, ideas, taste, desires, loves and passion when designing and building. Anthony

Response:

 In my experience, the homes that obtain the highest selling prices are ones which a person used their own personal style, ideas, taste, desires, loves and passion when designing and building.

I’m a Real Estate Agent AND a Solar Contractor and I can tell you that unless the seller has neutral tastes, that’s not the case. The wierd one’s take alot longer to sell. — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

 In my experience, the homes that obtain the highest selling prices are ones which a person used their own personal style, ideas, taste, desires, loves and passion when designing and building. I’m a Real Estate Agent AND a Solar Contractor and I can tell you that unless the seller has neutral tastes, that’s not the case. The wierd one’s take alot longer to sell.

Hmm, I just finished buying a house. The "wierd ones" are the ones that I called my agent, said "Schedule a visit", and by the time he got on the phone to schedule a visit, it was sold. There was one cute little house that had been modified by the owner to have tile floors throughout (no carpet in the bedrooms is supposed to detract from the selling price, right?), radiant floor heating, etc., and by the time we went to make an offer the house had already sold for $4,000 above the asking price. In fact, on a per-square-foot basis it sold for more than any other house in that neighborhood this year. Now, granted, if you’re going to put purple countertops and green bathroom fixtures it’ll take longer to sell. But I don’t think we were talking about that. — BadTux News’n'Views: http://news.badtux.net —–= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =—– http://www.newsfeeds.com – The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! —–==  Over 80,000 Newsgroups – 16 Different Servers! =—–

Response:

There was one cute little house that had been modified by the owner to have tile floors throughout (no carpet in the bedrooms is supposed to detract from the selling price, right?), radiant floor heating, etc., and by the time we went to make an

Tile throughout sells well in Florida anyway. People with kids and pets love tile. offer the house had already sold for $4,000 above the asking price. In fact, on a per-square-foot basis it sold for more than any other house in that neighborhood this year.

These days finding a buyer for any decent home is easy. Now let’s see them get it financed. If it doesn’t appraise high enough, the seller may have to lower the price. If you really like the house and have a larger down payment than the other buyer, you may still have a chance at the house. Keep in touch with the seller. Prices are SO jacked up in South Florida, getting a high enough appriasal to obtain financing is becoming a major problem. I had a Condo that was "sold" twice at $159.900. Both fell through and a South American walked in with $127,000 cash and got it. — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

There was one cute little house that had been modified by the owner to have tile floors throughout (no carpet in the bedrooms is supposed to detract from the selling price, right?), radiant floor heating, etc., and by the time we went to make an Tile throughout sells well in Florida anyway. People with kids and pets love tile.

I’m in Arizona. I’m thinking of putting tile throughout in my current house, but mostly because of my allergies. Tile in living areas is common here, either travertine tile or saltillo tile being the most common, but tile in bedrooms for some reason is not desired here. offer the house had already sold for $4,000 above the asking price. In fact, on a per-square-foot basis it sold for more than any other house in that neighborhood this year. These days finding a buyer for any decent home is easy. Now let’s see them get it financed. If it doesn’t appraise high enough, the seller may have to lower the price. If you really like the house and have a larger down payment than the other buyer, you may still have a chance at the house. Keep in touch with the seller.

Uhm, I already bought a house. Like I said, "I just bought a house". The house I bought is larger and better built, but has a smaller back yard. It needed a little more work, but that just gives me an excuse to dust off rusty old skills from a childhood spent assisting my father and grandfather in their projects.  Prices are SO jacked up in South Florida, getting a high enough appriasal to obtain financing is becoming a major problem. I had a Condo that was "sold" twice at $159.900. Both fell through and a South American walked in with $127,000 cash and got it.

Ouch. Yeah, the same deal is happening in some neighborhoods here in Arizona. Housing has appreciated at 9% so far this year, far beyond what it should given that the local economy sucks. But people are seeing 30 year loans at 5.99%, saying "Why am I renting?!", and jumping into the housing market, and of course that drives up prices. I was rather amused to see the gyrations that the bank’s appraiser had to go through in order to find comparables that would justify the selling price on this home. The problem is that this is a little infill "pocket neighborhood" of fairly sizable well built homes in the middle of a neighborhood of much smaller/less well-built homes that had been built 5 years earlier, so he had to go to neighborhoods over a mile away in order to find comparables that would justify the selling price (which he did — with a whopping $100 to spare :-) . — BadTux News’n'Views: http://news.badtux.net —–= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =—– http://www.newsfeeds.com – The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! —–==  Over 80,000 Newsgroups – 16 Different Servers! =—–

Response:

so he had to go to neighborhoods over a mile away in order to find comparables that would justify the selling price (which he did — with a whopping $100 to spare :-) .

What the banks get when they play that game is incresed forclosure rates. Then heads roll, and they go in the opposite direction. Go figure? According to a recent Consumer Reports article, Tuscon was named as being 15-20% overpriced. Miami/Ft. Lauderdale was 31-48% over the incomes in those areas! I saw lots of Solar Water in Sedona, and I’d love to spend a few years there, but the prices! — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

whats OTOH?

http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/ http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/html/entry/OTOH.html OTOH // [Usenet; very common] On The Other Hand. Hi, all-

Hi We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)?

It can be an OK idea. Your mileage may vary. You will save the costs of the shingles and solar panel mounts. You will likely have labor costs for the installation of both shingles and PV panels anyhow so combining the two into a single step may save some money. 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel?

It works better if you use solar panels that are designed for this task. Look for "building integrated" solar panels such as the Uni-Solar stuff. Some random links found using google. http://www.uni-solar.com/bipv_resid.html http://atlantisenergy.com/atlhome/product.htm http://www.powerlight.com/products/product_details.cfm?product_id=23 http://www.solarwall.com/roof/roof.html http://www.bfrl.nist.gov/863/bipv/documents/ieeeFNL.pdf http://www.energotech.gr/solar3.htm http://www.ntb.ch/TT/Labors/EMS/solar_window.html 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?)

It all depends on the installation, panels and type of roof. I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking.

It depends on the technology you are using. For instance, the standing seam panels from Uni-Solar are 9 to 18 feet long. You can also get the field applied laminate and stick it to any size roofing panels that are larger than these dimensions. All of their connectors are on one end. This end is typically mounted at the roof peak. This is not going to require a lot of holes in the roof and seems unlikely to leak. This is also likely to be somewhat more durable and longer lasting than the typical asphalt shingle. Anthony

Response:

so he had to go to neighborhoods over a mile away in order to find comparables that would justify the selling price (which he did — with a whopping $100 to spare :-) .

What the banks get when they play that game is incresed forclosure rates. Then heads roll, and they go in the opposite direction. Go figure? According to a recent Consumer Reports article, Tuscon was named as being 15-20% overpriced. Miami/Ft. Lauderdale was 31-48% over the incomes in those areas! I saw lots of Solar Water in Sedona, and I’d love to spend a few years there, but the prices! — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

There was one cute little house that had been modified by the owner to have tile floors throughout (no carpet in the bedrooms is supposed to detract from the selling price, right?), radiant floor heating, etc., and by the time we went to make an

Tile throughout sells well in Florida anyway. People with kids and pets love tile. offer the house had already sold for $4,000 above the asking price. In fact, on a per-square-foot basis it sold for more than any other house in that neighborhood this year.

These days finding a buyer for any decent home is easy. Now let’s see them get it financed. If it doesn’t appraise high enough, the seller may have to lower the price. If you really like the house and have a larger down payment than the other buyer, you may still have a chance at the house. Keep in touch with the seller. Prices are SO jacked up in South Florida, getting a high enough appriasal to obtain financing is becoming a major problem. I had a Condo that was "sold" twice at $159.900. Both fell through and a South American walked in with $127,000 cash and got it. — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

I remember when Reagan took office he had all the panels removed from the roof of the Whitehouse that Carter installed. What if one of the Reagan’s or Bush’s are interested in buying your home, and they can’t remove the panels? :) Retrofit gives you more options. — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

Response:

whats OTOH?

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Response:

Hi Edward; whats OTOH?

An an acronym: OTOH = On The Other Hand http://www.acronymfinder.com/ Duane —      Home of the $35 LED solar tracker.     http://www.redrok.com/electron.htm#led3    CUL8ER                          Receiver   Powered by                            [*]  Thermonuclear     SolarEnergyfrom the Sun /////| Energy(the Sun)                 / / // / /|                               / / /  /  /  / |    WA0VBE               /   / /   /   /  / /|   Ziggy               /    /    / /   /    /  |                   /   /    /     / /   /  / | "Red Rock Energy" ===  === /   /     ===   /    === Duane C. Johnson, Designer===   ===       ===  /  | 1825 Florence St  Mirrors,Heliostats,Controls & Mounts| White Bear Lake, Minnesota                     /   | USA         55110-3364                            | (651)635-5O65    work                        /    | (651)426-4766   home  use Courier New Font        | (413)556-659O  Fax                copyright   /     | (651)583-2O62 Red Rock Energy Site (C)980907  ===    | http://www.redrok.com/index.htm    (My New Web site) | These are my opinions, and not that of Unisys Corp.  ===

Response:

http://info.astrian.net/jargon/terms/o/OTOH.html

Response:

I remember when Reagan took office he had all the panels removed from the roof of the Whitehouse that Carter installed. What if one of the Reagan’s or Bush’s are interested in buying your home, and they can’t remove the panels? :) Retrofit gives you more options.

… What if someone buys your house and they don’t like the kitchen sink or counter? What if they don’t like the lime green toilet or want to change the wood shingles for concrete ones? Anything in a house can be changed, removed, rebuilt or remodeled. All it takes it money and/or time. Potentially, a well installed and attractive looking solar system could be an asset and may increase the selling price of the house. A poorly installed and ugly one may not, even if it does the job perfectly well. Personally, I’ve never been fond of the whole "your house is an investment" idea that the real estate folks like to push. Yes, you may sell your house at some point but is it worth it to live in a house that is designed to fit the lowest common denominator or which someone else tells you other people want in a home? In my experience, the homes that obtain the highest selling prices are ones which a person used their own personal style, ideas, taste, desires, loves and passion when designing and building. Anthony

Response:

There was one cute little house that had been modified by the owner to have tile floors throughout (no carpet in the bedrooms is supposed to detract from the selling price, right?), radiant floor heating, etc., and by the time we went to make an Tile throughout sells well in Florida anyway. People with kids and pets love tile.

I’m in Arizona. I’m thinking of putting tile throughout in my current house, but mostly because of my allergies. Tile in living areas is common here, either travertine tile or saltillo tile being the most common, but tile in bedrooms for some reason is not desired here. offer the house had already sold for $4,000 above the asking price. In fact, on a per-square-foot basis it sold for more than any other house in that neighborhood this year. These days finding a buyer for any decent home is easy. Now let’s see them get it financed. If it doesn’t appraise high enough, the seller may have to lower the price. If you really like the house and have a larger down payment than the other buyer, you may still have a chance at the house. Keep in touch with the seller.

Uhm, I already bought a house. Like I said, "I just bought a house". The house I bought is larger and better built, but has a smaller back yard. It needed a little more work, but that just gives me an excuse to dust off rusty old skills from a childhood spent assisting my father and grandfather in their projects.  Prices are SO jacked up in South Florida, getting a high enough appriasal to obtain financing is becoming a major problem. I had a Condo that was "sold" twice at $159.900. Both fell through and a South American walked in with $127,000 cash and got it.

Ouch. Yeah, the same deal is happening in some neighborhoods here in Arizona. Housing has appreciated at 9% so far this year, far beyond what it should given that the local economy sucks. But people are seeing 30 year loans at 5.99%, saying "Why am I renting?!", and jumping into the housing market, and of course that drives up prices. I was rather amused to see the gyrations that the bank’s appraiser had to go through in order to find comparables that would justify the selling price on this home. The problem is that this is a little infill "pocket neighborhood" of fairly sizable well built homes in the middle of a neighborhood of much smaller/less well-built homes that had been built 5 years earlier, so he had to go to neighborhoods over a mile away in order to find comparables that would justify the selling price (which he did — with a whopping $100 to spare :-) . — BadTux News’n'Views: http://news.badtux.net —–= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =—– http://www.newsfeeds.com – The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! —–==  Over 80,000 Newsgroups – 16 Different Servers! =—–

Response:

Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)?

Depends on what you are trying to accomplish.  If you want it to look better, a "built-in" look might be preferable to something just sitting on the roof.  OTOH-it might make it more diffiuclt to do whatever maintanence might be required, or to repair a roof leak should it occur down the road. 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?)

I doubt there is sufficient evidence to make a determination on something like this.  Until hundreds of thousands of such installations exist for dozens of years, there is no way to really tell.  The installation issue is a major kicker in the pants as well. There are very few people with any substantial experience in this type of installation, so getting someone that has put in a few hundred of them is going to be difficult. I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

Shingles are pretty cheap compared to the solar panels.  The few dollars saved in materials is insignificant, compared to the extra labor, and probably the extra materials required to put the panels in. I think it boils down to this – if you want to build them in, get someone who has done it many times before.  Get many references from the installer and call the references and see what they have to say. Ask the references if they know of anyone else who has done this and call them.  In the end, you will probably have to make a judgement call, and live with the results.

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Edward C. wrote whats OTOH?

…..On The Other Hand….. HTH (Hope This Helps) Caroline xxx

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The shape of mounting brackets makes flashing an exercise in futility. What you should do is have square pitch boxes fabricated at a metal shop. Mount those to the roof. Cut through the bottom of the pitch box, mount the brackets to your structural members, and fill the pitch boxes with hot tar. Then counter flash the pitch box.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

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Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)?

If the solar collector is designed for this type of installation, it can be neater looking and save on roofing material costs. 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel?

No. Some types of solar collectors – particularly tubular evacuated glass tube collectors – would leak badly when it rained, and cannot substitute for roofing. 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?)

Depends on installation. A proper installation, whether built into the roof (like a skylight) or mounted on top will not leak. I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

I mounted a mast for a tv antenna on my roof, drilling a hole through the shingles and anchoring the base with a lagbolt – and sealing it with silicone caulk. 10 years later, and still no leaks. Plumbing vent pipes and metal chimneys are punched through roofing, but with proper use of metal and rubber flashing they can be leak free. CM

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 In my experience, the homes that obtain the highest selling prices are ones which a person used their own personal style, ideas, taste, desires, loves and passion when designing and building.

I’m a Real Estate Agent AND a Solar Contractor and I can tell you that unless the seller has neutral tastes, that’s not the case. The wierd one’s take alot longer to sell. — All the best, www.iwantsolar.com

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The best I have seen are the field applied standing seam PV panels from Unisolar. Finding a roofing sub contractor to your prime building contractor that can apply these may be a challenge though. http://www.uni-solar.com/bipv_resid_field_appl.html

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

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 In my experience, the homes that obtain the highest selling prices are ones which a person used their own personal style, ideas, taste, desires, loves and passion when designing and building. I’m a Real Estate Agent AND a Solar Contractor and I can tell you that unless the seller has neutral tastes, that’s not the case. The wierd one’s take alot longer to sell.

Hmm, I just finished buying a house. The "wierd ones" are the ones that I called my agent, said "Schedule a visit", and by the time he got on the phone to schedule a visit, it was sold. There was one cute little house that had been modified by the owner to have tile floors throughout (no carpet in the bedrooms is supposed to detract from the selling price, right?), radiant floor heating, etc., and by the time we went to make an offer the house had already sold for $4,000 above the asking price. In fact, on a per-square-foot basis it sold for more than any other house in that neighborhood this year. Now, granted, if you’re going to put purple countertops and green bathroom fixtures it’ll take longer to sell. But I don’t think we were talking about that. — BadTux News’n'Views: http://news.badtux.net —–= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =—– http://www.newsfeeds.com – The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! —–==  Over 80,000 Newsgroups – 16 Different Servers! =—–

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Hi, all- We’re building a house and are planning on installing solar PV panels as well as solar hot water collector panels on the roof. I’ve had a few people suggest installing the panels on the roof *before* the roofing material and shingling around the panels. My questions: 1. Is this a good idea (ever)? 2. Can you do this will any type of solar panel? 3. What is more susceptible to leaking: a) solar panels built into the roof, or; b) solar panels mounted on top of a roof? (or does it all depend on the installation?) I can see where building the panels into the roof might save a little money on shingles, but it seems that increased labor costs would eat up any savings in materials.  OTOH, I am assuming that solar panels, when mounted on an existing roof, require holes to be drilled through the roof which I would think increases the likelihood of the roof leaking. kickaha

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